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  • Overview

    OVERVIEW

    A summer research opportunity for high school and undergraduate students focusing on rigorous, applied, interdisciplinary data science research and rooted in a cohort community.

    The Data & Computing Summer Lab is an immersive 10-week paid summer research program at the University of Chicago. In the program, high school and undergraduate students are paired with a data science mentor in various domains, including: computer science, data science, social science, climate and energy policy, public policy, materials science, and biomedical research. Through this pairing the research assistant will engage with and hone their skills in research methodologies, practices, and teamwork. We encourage participation from a broad range of students, and require no prior research experience to apply.

    BENEFITS

    Students in the program are immersed in a research lab and given unparalleled, first-hand access to impactful, applied data science research. Students will gain not only an understanding of fundamental data science methodologies but specialized training within the application areas specific to their lab’s research thrust. Students are asked to practice communicating their research findings throughout the summer, culminating in final videos. The final videos are presented during an end-of-summer symposium, which is run like a professional conference and provides students a chance to field questions about their project and share the outcomes of their research projects. Students also engage in professional development and training that can help them prepare for future careers in data science and computing. Additionally, many alumni continue research work with their mentor after the program ends.

    COHORT

    In the program, students are welcomed into a cohort of their peers who represent diverse backgrounds, interests, and ambitions. Through near-peer mentoring, social gatherings, and group work on projects, students in this cohort not only become better trained data and computational scientists, but better equipped to tackle any challenges ahead through their experience with group work and collaboration. Students meet weekly in small thematic groups called “clusters” to discuss progress, ask questions, and hear about each others’ projects.

    MOTIVATION

    Broadening participation in data science and computing, especially among underrepresented groups, is essential not only for equalizing opportunities but envisioning – and creating – a future that is truly representative of the world around us. Computational work is often stereotyped as people working alone writing code, when in reality data science is a team sport, inherently interdisciplinary, and in constant conversation with real-world issues to achieve measurable, meaningful impact. We aim to train and immerse students in the research lifecycle, and prepare them for critical transitions and sustained career paths.

    PROGRAMMING

    To supplement their research work, we provide an exciting array of programming for students during the summer. A highlight of the summer programming is a weekly speaker series featuring researchers at the forefront of data science and computing. Speakers address topics ranging from their own unique and unconventional paths to data science research, to their innovative approaches to tackling important, impactful research questions. Students have the chance not only to hear from first-class speakers but also to introduce and be in conversation with them. In the 2020 program, we hosted 26 different speakers from a wide array of data science domains. You can watch select talks from the 2020 speaker series here.

    ALUMNI

    Summer Lab alumni have been co-authors on published papers and posters, created apps and software tools used by thousands of people, and pursued a variety of future paths within research and beyond. Check out the Project Profiles to learn more about previous student cohorts, and watch videos overviewing their summer research projects. Summer Lab alumna Aarthi Koripelly (‘19, ‘20) shared this about her experience in the program:

    The CDAC Summer Lab was a great experience for me to have exposure to the applications of computer science in other domains and gain technical knowledge. My projects have helped me hone my research and communication skills in writing reports, presenting to others, and submitting to a conference, which would not have been possible without the opportunities CDAC has provided.

    Read about the 2021 Summer Lab program. Summer Lab graphics designed by Angela Liu.

  • Project Profiles

    See 2019-2020 Cohort Project Profiles here.

    2021 Cohort

    Mentor: Eamon Duede

    Mentor: Ravi Madduri

    Mentor: Chenhao Tan

    Mentors: Daniel Grzenda & David Uminsky, Social Impact Track

    Mentors: Daniel Grzenda & David Uminsky, Social Impact Track

    Mentor: Ravi Madduri

    Mentor: Heather Zheng

    Mentors: Daniel Grzenda & David Uminsky, Social Impact Track

    Mentor: Sarah Sebo

    Mentors: Daniel Grzenda & David Uminsky, Social Impact Track

    Mentor: Kyle Chard

    Mentors: Daniel Grzenda & David Uminsky, Social Impact Track

    Mentors: Daniel Grzenda & David Uminsky, Social Impact Track

     

    Mentor: Kyle Chard

    Mentors: Kate Keahey & Zhuo Zhen, Argonne National Laboratory

    Mentors: Daniel Grzenda & David Uminsky, Social Impact Track

     

    Mentor: Blase Ur

    Mentor: Pedro Lopes

    Mentor: Sarah Sebo

    Mentor: Nick Feamster

    Mentor: Blase Ur

    Mentor: Bryon Aragam

    Mentors: Giuseppe B. Cerati & Jeremy Hewes & Daniel Grzenda

    Mentor: Blase Ur

    Mentor: Pedro Lopes

    Mentors: Daniel Grzenda & David Uminsky, Social Impact Track

    Mentor: Brian Nord

    Mentor: Jai Yu

    Mentor: Nick Feamster

    Mentors: Giuseppe B. Cerati & Jeremy Hewes & Daniel Grzenda

    Mentor: Junchen Jiang

    Mentors: Nick Feamster, Nicole Marwell, Guilherme Martins & Kyle MacMillan

    Mentor: Chenhao Tan

    Mentor: Nicholas Marchio

    Mentor: Ben Zhao

    Mentors: Kate Keahey & Zhuo Zhen, Argonne National Laboratory

    Mentors: Daniel Grzenda & David Uminsky, Social Impact Track

    Mentor: Shan Lu

    Mentors: Daniel Grzenda & David Uminsky, Social Impact Track

    Mentors: Nick FeamsterNicole Marwell, Guilherme Martins & Kyle MacMillan

    Mentors: Daniel Grzenda & David Uminsky, Social Impact Track

    Mentors: Brian Nord & Yuxin Chen

    Mentors: Daniel Grzenda & David Uminsky, Social Impact Track

    Mentors: Daniel Grzenda & David Uminsky, Social Impact Track

    Mentor: Lorenzo Orecchia

    Mentor: Jai Yu

  • Mentors

    See previous Summer Lab mentors here.

    2021 Mentors

    Anjali Adukia is an assistant professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and the College. In her work, she is interested in understanding how to reduce inequalities such that children from historically disadvantaged backgrounds have equal opportunities to fully develop their potential.  Her research is focused on understanding factors that motivate and shape behavior, preferences, attitudes, and educational decision-making, with a particular focus on early-life influences.  She examines how the provision of basic needs—such as safety, health, justice, and representation—can increase school participation and improve child outcomes in developing contexts.

    Adukia completed her doctoral degree at the Harvard University Graduate School of Education, with an academic focus on the economics of education. Her work has been funded from organizations such as the William T. Grant Foundation, the National Academy of Education, and the Spencer Foundation.  Her dissertation won awards from the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM), Association for Education Finance and Policy (AEFP), and the Comparative and International Education Society (CIES). Adukia received recognition for her teaching from the University of Chicago Feminist Forum.  She completed her masters of education degrees in international education policy and higher education (administration, planning, and social policy) from Harvard University and her bachelor of science degree in molecular and integrative physiology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  She is a faculty research fellow of the National Bureau of Economic Research and a faculty affiliate of the University of Chicago Education Lab and Crime Lab.  She is on the editorial board of Education Finance and Policy.  She was formerly a board member of the Young Nonprofit Professionals Network – San Francisco Bay Area. She continues to work with non-governmental organizations internationally, such as UNICEF and Manav Sadhna in Gujarat, India.

    Anna Woodard is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Chicago, where she is part of Globus Labs.

    Ben Zhao is a Neubauer Professor of Computer Science at University of Chicago. Over the years, he’s followed his own interests in pursuing research problems that he finds intellectually interesting and meaningful. That’s led him to work on a sequence of areas from P2P networks, online social networks, SDR/open spectrum systems, graph mining and modeling, user behavior analysis, to adversarial machine learning. Since 2016, he’s mostly worked on security and privacy problems in machine learning and mobile systems. His meandering interests have led him to publish at a range of top conferences, including Usenix Security/Oakland/CCS, IMC/WWW, CHI/CSCW, and Mobicom/SIGCOMM/NSDI.

    Together with Prof. Heather Zheng, he co-directs the SAND Lab (Security, Algorithms, Networking and Data) at University of Chicago. He received his PhD in Computer Science from UC Berkeley in 2004, where he was advised by John Kubiatowicz and Anthony Joseph, and created the Tapestry distributed hash table (dissertation). He received my MS from Berkeley in 2000, and his BS in computer science from Yale in 1997. He is an ACM Distinguished Scientist, a recipient of the NSF CAREER award (2005), MIT Tech Review’s TR-35 Award (Young Innovators Under 35) (2006), IEEE Internet Technical Committee’s Early Career Award (2014), and one of ComputerWorld’s Top 40 Technology Innovators under 40. His papers have somewhere around 28,000 citations and an H-index of 66 (for whatever that’s worth). In some of his “free time,” he writes about research and PhD life on Quora.

    Blase Ur is an assistant professor of computer science at the University of Chicago. He founded the UChicago SUPERgroup, an interdisciplinary research collective with dozens of members. Their research spans computer security, privacy, and human-computer interaction (HCI). They are especially interested in using data-driven methods to help users make better security and privacy decisions, as well as to make complex computer systems more usable for non-technical users. Their work has been supported by six NSF grants, as well as grants from Mozilla Research and the Data Transparency Lab.

    He has been fortunate to receive three best paper awards (CHI 2017, USENIX Security 2016, and UbiComp 2014), the 2018 SIGCHI Outstanding Dissertation Award, the 2016 John Karat Usable Privacy and Security Student Research Award, an NDSEG fellowship, a Fulbright scholarship, and three honorable mentions for best paper (CHI 2020, CHI 2016, and CHI 2012). Jointly with the other core members of the CMU passwords group, he also received the 2020 Allen Newell Award for Research Excellence and the 2018 IEEE Cybersecurity Award for Practice. He has strong interests in teaching and K-12 outreach, particularly for broadening participation in CS. He earned my AB in computer science from Harvard University and worked for three years at Rutgers University on outreach and diversity programs.

    Brian Nord uses artificial intelligence to search for clues on the origins and development of the universe. He actively works on statistical modeling of strong gravitational lenses, the cosmic microwave background, and galaxy clusters. As leader of the Deep Skies Lab, he brings together experts in computer science and technology to study questions of cosmology, including dark energy, dark matter, and the early universe, through large-scale data analysis.

    Nord has authored or co-authored nearly 50 papers. He trains scientists in public communication, advocates for science education and funding, and works to develop equitable and just research environments. As co-leader of education and public engagement at the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at UChicago, he organizes Space Explorers, a program to help underrepresented minorities in high school engage in hands-on physics experiences outside the classroom. He is an associate scientist at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, where he is a member of the Machine Intelligence Group.

    Homepage.

    Bryon Aragam is an Assistant Professor and Topel Faculty Scholar in the Booth School of Business at the University of Chicago. He studies high-dimensional statistics, machine learning, and optimization. His research focuses on mathematical aspects of data science and statistical machine learning in nontraditional settings. Some of his recent projects include problems in graphical modeling, nonparametric statistics, personalization, nonconvex optimization, and high-dimensional inference. He is also involved with developing open-source software and solving problems in interpretability, ethics, and fairness in artificial intelligence. His work has been published in top statistics and machine learning venues such as the Annals of Statistics, Neural Information Processing Systems, the International Conference on Machine Learning, and the Journal of Statistical Software.

    Prior to joining the University of Chicago, he was a project scientist and postdoctoral researcher in the Machine Learning Department at Carnegie Mellon University. He completed his PhD in Statistics and a Masters in Applied Mathematics at UCLA, where he was an NSF graduate research fellow. Bryon has also served as a data science consultant for technology and marketing firms, where he has worked on problems in survey design and methodology, ranking, customer retention, and logistics.

    Homepage.

    Chenhao Tan is an assistant professor at the Department of Computer Science and the Department of Information Science (by courtesy) at University of Colorado Boulder. His main research interests include language and social dynamics, human-centered machine learning, and multi-community engagement. He is also broadly interested in computational social science, natural language processing, and artificial intelligence.

    Homepage.

    Dr. Christopher M. Graziul holds a PhD in sociology from the University of Chicago as well as B.S. degrees in physics and applied computational mathematics from Virginia Tech. His work developing and applying novel quantitative methodologies to sensitive data sources spans multiple domains of research, including medical care, education, and vital records. His current research integrates diverse theoretical perspectives and computational techniques to drive the development of theory-based data science in service of public policy, specifically the application of the phenomenological variant of ecological systems theory (PVEST) to understand the psychosocial and developmental mechanisms that link the language of policing to the quality of encounters between law enforcement officers and male minority youth.

    Daniel Grzenda is a Staff Data Scientist supporting the partnership with the 11th Hour Project at the University. He engages with social impact organizations across the domains of energy, food and agriculture, human rights, and marine technology, to support applications of data and computer science. Daniel’s work is focused on increasing the data capacity of these organizations, lowering the barriers to mission driven data science, and empowering these organizations through the development of sustainable technical solutions.

    David Uminsky joined the University of Chicago in September 2020 as a senior research associate and Executive Director of Data Science. He was previously an associate professor of Mathematics and Executive Director of the Data Institute at University of San Francisco (USF). His research interests are in machine learning, signal processing, pattern formation, and dynamical systems.  David is an associate editor of the Harvard Data Science Review.  He was selected in 2015 by the National Academy of Sciences as a Kavli Frontiers of Science Fellow. He is also the founding Director of the BS in Data Science at USF and served as Director of the MS in Data Science program from 2014-2019. During the summer of 2018, David served as the Director of Research for the Mathematical Science Research Institute Undergrad Program on the topic of Mathematical Data Science.

    Before joining USF he was a combined NSF and UC President’s Fellow at UCLA, where he was awarded the Chancellor’s Award for outstanding postdoctoral research. He holds a Ph.D. in Mathematics from Boston University and a BS in Mathematics from Harvey Mudd College.

    Dylan Halpern is the Principal Software Engineer for the US Covid Atlas at the Center. Utilizing methods of geospatial data analytics, visualization, and web development, he works in domains of public health, urban experience and activity, and transit. He holds a Master in City Planning from MIT, and previous positions include research roles with MIT Senseable City Lab, Civic Data Design Lab, and City Form Lab, and a Fulbright research fellowship in Brazil.

    Eamon Duede is a joint PhD Candidate in the departments of Philosophy and the Committee on Conceptual and Historical Studies of Science, and was formerly the Executive Director of the Knowledge Lab. His work is broadly at the intersection of the philosophy of science and computational science of science. In the philosophy of science, he focuses on models, simulations, and artificial intelligence / machine learning in science. In computational science of science, he uses large scale, computational analysis alongside targeted intelligent surveying and field experiments to understand how institutions and communities produce knowledge.

    Since joining Fermilab in 2016, my scientific work has focused on the search of new physics in neutrino oscillation experiments.

    As a member of the MicroBooNE Collaboration (since 2016), I am mainly interested in searching for sterile neutrinos, as well as in the development of techniques for the reconstruction and analysis of Liquid Argon Time Project Chambers data. I also joined the DUNE Collaboration, where my main interest is CP violation in the neutrino sector.

    Previously I worked for about a decade on the CMS experiments, with major contributions to the Higgs boson discovery, SUSY searches and Standard Model measurements.

    I served as CMS Track Reconstruction convener in 2013-2014.

    Guilherme Martins is the Senior Programming Specialist at CDAC. Guilherme has contributed to critical research projects bringing an extensive domain knowledge expertise acquired over his years in the industry and academia. His skillset includes embedded software development for specialized hardware, data engineering, and software automation.  Most recently, he developed a method for summarizing network traffic utilization while retaining critical information of over-the-top consumer internet applications such as Netflix, Youtube, Amazon, and Facebook. With fine-grain information about their internet utilization, internet consumers are now empowered to make data-driven decisions regarding their home internet infrastructure. The design and implementation of the software allow extensibility and open an interface to new applications ranging from performance monitoring to network security. He’ll be working closely with Nick Feamster and other Principal Investigators to establish data analysis pipelines.

    Heather Zheng is the Neubauer Professor of Computer Science at University of Chicago. She received my PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering from University of Maryland, College Park in 1999. Prior to joining University of Chicago in 2017, she spent 6 years in industry labs (Bell-Labs, NJ and Microsoft Research Asia), and 12 years at University of California at Santa Barbara. At UChicago, she co-directs the SAND Lab (Systems, Algorithms, Networking and Data) together with Prof. Ben Y. Zhao.

    Homepage.

    Dr Jai Yu’s research focuses on understanding the neurophysiological mechanisms that support the formation of knowledge. His lab records and analyzes neural data. Prior to joining the University of Chicago, he worked as a data scientist at a Silicon Valley neuromodulation startup where he used advanced data analytics to guide the development of devices for treating neurological conditions.

    Jamie Saxon will join CDAC as a postdoctoral scholar in summer 2020, and was previously a postdoctoral fellow with the Harris School of Public Policy and the Center for Spatial Data Science of the University of Chicago.

    He uses large data sources to measure the availability and use of civic and social resources in American cities. He is particularly interested in mobility among neighborhoods and the consequences of this mobility. He has also studied how gerrymandering affects representation, and developed powerful automated districting software.

    He is committed to developing resources for computational social science research, and has taught programming and statistics for masters’ students in public policy.

    He was trained as a particle physicist and was previously an Enrico Fermi Fellow on the ATLAS Experiment on CERN’s Large Hadron Collider at the Enrico Fermi Institute. He worked for many years on electronics and firmware for measuring and reconstructing particle trajectories. As a graduate student at the University of Pennsylvania, he made noteworthy contributions to the discovery and first measurements of the Higgs Boson in the two-photon channel.

    His CV is here; you can also find him on LinkedIn or GitHub.

    Jean-Baptiste Reynier is a recent graduate from the University of Chicago (B.S. in Biology 2018, M.S. in Computer Science 2019). He is currently working as a data science analyst at the Olopade Lab. His work focuses on uncovering the characteristics of the tumor immune micro-environment in breast cancer, using genomic data.

    Jeremy Hewes is a postdoctoral researcher at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory working on the DUNE project.

    Julia Koschinsky is the Executive Director of the Center for Spatial Data Science at the University of Chicago and has been part of the GeoDa team for over 16 years. She has been conducting and managing research funded through federal awards of over $8 million to gain insights from the spatial dimensions of urban challenges in housing, health, and the built environment.

    Junchen Jiang is an assistant professor of Computer Science at the University of Chicago. He received his PhD degree from Carnegie Mellon University in 2017. His research interests are computer networks and systems and their intersections with machine learning. He is a recipient of Google Faculty Research Award in 2019, best paper award at ACM/IEEE Symposium on Edge Computing, best paper runner-up at ACM CoNEXT 2012, and CMU Computer Science Doctoral Dissertation Award in 2017.

    Kate Keahey is one of the pioneers of infrastructure cloud computing. She created the Nimbus project, recognized as the first open source Infrastructure-as-a-Service implementation, and continues to work on research aligning cloud computing concepts with the needs of scientific datacenters and applications. To facilitate such research for the community at large, Kate leads the Chameleon project, providing a deeply reconfigurable, large-scale, and open experimental platform for Computer Science research. To foster the recognition of contributions to science made by software projects, Kate co-founded and serves as co-Editor-in-Chief of the SoftwareX journal, a new format designed to publish software contributions. Kate is a Scientist at Argonne National Laboratory and a Senior Fellow at the Computation Institute at the University of Chicago.

    Kyle Chard is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory. He has been Program Director of the Data & Computing Summer Lab since its first iteration under CDAC in 2019, and previously oversaw the Summer Internship Program ran by the former Computation Institute.

    He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Victoria University of Wellington in 2011. He co-leads the Globus Labs research group which focuses on a broad range of research problems in data-intensive computing and research data management. He currently leads projects related to parallel programming in Python, scientific reproducibility, and elastic and cost-aware use of cloud infrastructure.

    Lorenzo Orecchia is an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science. His research focuses on applying mathematical techniques from discrete and continuous optimization to design algorithms for computational challenges arising in a variety of applications, including Machine Learning, Numerical Analysis and Combinatorial Optimization.

    I earned my PhD from the Committee on Human Development (currently the Department of Comparative Human Development) in the Child and Developmental Psychology Program. Before returning to Chicago, I was the endowed Board of Overseers Professor and Director of the Interdisciplinary Studies of Human Development (ISHD) program and faculty member in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. At UPenn, I was Director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Health Achievement Neighborhoods Growth and Ethnic Studies (CHANGES) and also guided as its inaugural director, the W. E. B. Du Bois Collective Research Institute. Both appointments continue to frame my developmental scholarship and application of phenomenological variant of ecological systems theory (PVEST). It is a systems theory and, most important, is inclusive of all human experience and provides an identity-focused cultural ecological perspective. I evolved the theory over a decade because non-problematizing perspectives about people of color were generally unavailable.  Accordingly, P-VEST affords an authentic representation of human development processes both for Whites and People of Color as lives evolve in an ethnically, racially and economically diverse world. The conceptual framework addresses resiliency, identity, and competence formation processes for diverse humans—particularly youth—both in the United States and abroad.

    Marshini Chetty is an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Chicago, where she co-directs the Amyoli Internet Research Lab or AIR lab. She specializes in human-computer interaction, usable privacy and security, and ubiquitous computing. Marshini designs, implements, and evaluates technologies to help users manage different aspects of Internet use from privacy and security to performance, and costs. She often works in resource-constrained settings and uses her work to help inform Internet policy. She has a Ph.D. in Human-Centered Computing from Georgia Institute of Technology, USA and a Masters and Bachelors in Computer Science from the University of Cape Town, South Africa. In her former lives, Marshini was on the faculty in the Computer Science Department at Princeton University and the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her work has won best paper awards at SOUPS, CHI, and CSCW and has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Security Agency, Intel, Microsoft, Facebook, and multiple Google Faculty Research Awards.

    Homepage.

    Michael Sherman is a Software Engineer at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory. He works on the ChameleonCloud Testbed, supporting research in edge and cloud computing. Previously he worked on the COSMOS and ORBIT testbeds making repeatable environments available to researchers in real-time and wireless systems. His research interests include software defined networking, edge computing, and reliable systems.

    Nico is a Research Data Scientist with the Mansueto Institute. He holds a multi-disciplinary background in data science and urban research with a strong interest in harnessing advances in data and machine learning, which he is now applying to gain deeper insights into the science behind cities. In the past, he worked at Civis Analytics as a Senior Data Scientist where he combined predictive modeling and survey research to provide actionable guidance to organizations in the technology, local government, and political spaces. Before moving to Chicago, he spent six years at the Brookings Institution as an Associate Fellow, publishing numerous reports on global trade and urban development patterns and engineering new data resources to fill gaps in public data.

    Nick Feamster is Neubauer Professor in the Department of Computer Science and the College. He researches computer networking and networked systems, with a particular interest in Internet censorship, privacy, and the Internet of Things. His work on experimental networked systems and security aims to make networks easier to manage, more secure, and more available.

    Homepage

    Nicole Marwell is Associate Professor in the University of Chicago Crown Family School of Social Work, Policy, and Practice. She is also a faculty affiliate of the Department of Sociology, a faculty fellow at the Center for Spatial Data Science, and a member of the Faculty Advisory Council of the Mansueto Institute for Urban Innovation. Her research examines urban governance, with a focus on the diverse intersections between nonprofit organizations, government bureaucracies, and politics.

    Pedro Lopes is an Assistant Professor in Computer Science at the University of Chicago, where he leads the Human Computer Integration lab. Lopes’ research group focuses understanding how to integrate computer interfaces with the human body—creating the interface paradigm that supersedes wearable computing. They created wearable muscle stimulation devices that enable, for example, to: a user to manipulate a tool they never seen before, accelerate our reaction time, read and write information without using a screen, and transform someone’s arm into a plotter so they can solve complex problems with pen and paper. Their work is published at top-tier conferences (ACM CHI, ACM UIST, Cerebral Cortex). Pedro and his students have received one Best Paper award, three Best Talk Awards and two Best Paper nominations. Their work also captured the interest of media, such as MIT Technology Review, NBC, Discovery Channel, NewScientist, Wired and has been shown at Ars Electronica and World Economic Forum. (More: https://lab.plopes.org)

    Ravi Madduri is actively involved in developing innovative software and networking technology. For example, as lead architect of the Reliable File Transfer, he designed novel testing and profiling capabilities, ensuring that it met the needs of key communities such as TeraGrid.

    He implemented Grid file transfer patterns in the Java CoG Kit and developed a remote application virtualization infrastructure; the Grid-enable extension was incorporated in the Grid Service Authoring Toolkit and is used by NCI Information Systems.

    Madduri is applying new technology in diverse science and engineering domains. For example, Ihe is a key contributor to the Cancer Bioinformatics Grid. He played a lead role in the evolution of GridFTP and its adoption by researchers for the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and the Large Hadron Collider. Moreover, as part of the NEESgrid project, he helped scientific teams incorporate Grid technology into their earthquake engineering research.

    Samantha Riesenfeld is an Assistant Professor of Molecular Engineering and of Genetic Medicine, a member of the Committee on Immunology, an Associate Member of the Comprehensive Cancer Center, and co-director of the new Computational and Systems Immunology PhD track in Immunology and Molecular Engineering. She leads an interdisciplinary research program focused on developing and applying genomics-based machine learning approaches to investigate the cellular components, transcriptional circuitry, and dynamics underlying complex biological systems, with a special interest in inflammatory immune responses and solid tumor cancer.

    I am an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of Chicago. I received my PhD in Computer Science from Yale University in 2020. My current research explores social dynamics in human-robot interactions, where a robot’s social behaviors lead to positive outcomes for people (e.g., improved team dynamics and performance in a human-robot team, educational learning outcomes for children). During my PhD, I focused on developing robots that improve the performance of human-robot teams by shaping team dynamics to promote inclusion, trust, and cohesion.

    Shan Lu’s research focuses on software reliability, particularly detecting, diagnosing, and fixing concurrency bugs and performance bugs in large software systems.

    Shan received her Ph.D. at University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, in 2008. She was the Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor of Computer Sciences at University of Wisconsin, Madison, from 2009 to 2014.

    Shan has won Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in 2014, Distinguished Alumni Educator Award from Department of Computer Science at University of Illinois in 2013, and NSF Career Award in 2010. Her co-authored papers won ACM-SIGSOFT Distinguished Paper Award at FSE 2014, the Best Paper Award at USENIX FAST in 2013, ACM-SIGPLAN CACM Research Highlight Nomination in 2011, and IEEE Micro Top Picks in 2006. She currently serves as the Information Director of ACM-SIGOPS.

    Tarun Mangla will join CDAC as a postdoctoral scholar in summer 2020, and is currently a PhD student in the School of Computer Science at the Georgia Institute of Technology, co-advised by Mostafa Ammar and Ellen Zegura. His research interests span video streaming, network measurements, and cellular networks. He completed his bachelors in Computer Science and Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi (2014) and MS in Computer Science from Georgia Tech (2018). He is a recipient of the Best Paper Award at IFIP TMA, 2018.

    Teodora engages the community of researchers involved in computational image analysis at The University of Chicago across multi-disciplinary areas including: Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Economics, Public Policy, and Cancer Research.

    She serves as a catalyst for solving challenging questions in the research teams that she is supporting, such as: predicting oxygen support for COVID-19 patients, detecting prostate cancer, and analysis of messages related to identity in official educational setting. Teodora brings to the field practical expertise in state-of-the-art advanced technology: Supercomputers, Cloud Computing, Machine Learning, Image Analysis Techniques, and Big Data.

    Prior to joining RCC, Teodora earned her doctorate degree in Computer Science at Toulouse University in France. She won international challenges (IUS PICMUS 2016) in beamforming for ultrasound medical imaging.

    Yuxin Chen is an assistant professor at the Department of Computer Science at the University of Chicago. Previously, he was a postdoctoral scholar in Computing and Mathematical Sciences at Caltech, hosted by Prof. Yisong Yue. He received my Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from ETH Zurich, under the supervision of Prof. Andreas Krause. He is a recipient of the PIMCO Postdoctoral Fellowship in Computing and Mathematical Sciences, a Swiss National Science Foundation Early Postdoc.Mobility fellowship, and a Google European Doctoral Fellowship in Interactive Machine Learning.

    His research interest lies broadly in probabilistic reasoning and machine learning. He is currently working on developing interactive machine learning systems that involve active learning, sequential decision making, interpretable models and machine teaching. You can find more information in my Google scholar profile.

    Homepage.

    Zhuo Zhen is a cloud computing software developer at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory. She works on the Chameleon Cloud project where she built and operated the national Chameleon testbed which supports research and innovation in cloud computing.

  • DCSL Team

    Summer Lab Leadership

    Kyle Chard is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory. He has been Program Director of the Data & Computing Summer Lab since its first iteration under CDAC in 2019, and previously oversaw the Summer Internship Program ran by the former Computation Institute.

    He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Victoria University of Wellington in 2011. He co-leads the Globus Labs research group which focuses on a broad range of research problems in data-intensive computing and research data management. He currently leads projects related to parallel programming in Python, scientific reproducibility, and elastic and cost-aware use of cloud infrastructure.

    Julia Lane is the Executive Director of the Center for Data and Computing, responsible for shaping and executing the strategic vision of CDAC, building new research partnerships and outreach strategies to foster interdisciplinary collaborations, and ensuring that the University continues to broaden applications of data science and computing approaches.

    Katie Rosengarten is Program Manager at the Center for Data and Computing, responsible for overseeing strategic partnerships, management, execution, and evaluation of student research engagement opportunities for early high school learners through PhD students.

    David Uminsky joined the University of Chicago in September 2020 as a senior research associate and Executive Director of Data Science. He was previously an associate professor of Mathematics and Executive Director of the Data Institute at University of San Francisco (USF). His research interests are in machine learning, signal processing, pattern formation, and dynamical systems.  David is an associate editor of the Harvard Data Science Review.  He was selected in 2015 by the National Academy of Sciences as a Kavli Frontiers of Science Fellow. He is also the founding Director of the BS in Data Science at USF and served as Director of the MS in Data Science program from 2014-2019. During the summer of 2018, David served as the Director of Research for the Mathematical Science Research Institute Undergrad Program on the topic of Mathematical Data Science.

    Before joining USF he was a combined NSF and UC President’s Fellow at UCLA, where he was awarded the Chancellor’s Award for outstanding postdoctoral research. He holds a Ph.D. in Mathematics from Boston University and a BS in Mathematics from Harvey Mudd College.

    Lab Coordinators

    Kyle Macmillan is a PhD Student in Computer Science at the University of Chicago where he is advised by Professor Nick Feamster. He is a member of the NOISE Lab and is broadly interested in internet measurement, networks, and their applications in law and policy.

    He received my BSE in Electrical Engineering from Princeton University in 2020. His undergraduate thesis was advised by Professor Prateek Mittal.

    Matt is a second year CS PhD student in systems. His research focuses on cost-aware heterogeneous computing and he is part of the Globus Labs research group. Matt has helped mentor students over the past two years and joins the Summer Lab team formally this year as a graduate lab coordinator. Outside of his current research, Matt is an avid pilot and has a background in philosophy, law, and finance.

    Valerie Zhao is a 3rd-year PhD student in Computer Science at the University of Chicago, advised by Professor Blase Ur. Her work focuses on enhancing the experiences of non-technical users in programming smart homes and social robots. She graduated from Wellesley College in 2018, with a bachelor’s degree in Neuroscience and Computer Science with honors.

    Yujie is a predoctoral master’s student in CS and a member of Human Computer Integration Lab. Her research focuses on human-computer interaction, wearables, and haptics. She is interested in devising novel interactive devices and understanding their potential to improve user’s wellbeing. As a part of the CDAC Summer Lab 2020 cohort, Yujie is excited to be back to Summer Lab as a graduate lab coordinator this year to support aspiring students. 

    Zhuokai Zhao is a PhD student in the Computer Science Department at the University of Chicago, advised by Prof. Gordon Kindlmann and Prof. Michael Maire. His work focuses on understanding, visualizing, and building equivariant machine learning systems. Zhuokai received his bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and his master’s degree in Robotics from the Johns Hopkins University.

    Social Impact Track

    Daniel Grzenda is a Staff Data Scientist supporting the partnership with the 11th Hour Project at the University. He engages with social impact organizations across the domains of energy, food and agriculture, human rights, and marine technology, to support applications of data and computer science. Daniel’s work is focused on increasing the data capacity of these organizations, lowering the barriers to mission driven data science, and empowering these organizations through the development of sustainable technical solutions.

    Mindi has experience managing, sourcing and scoping a portfolio of data science experiential learning partnerships across social impact organizations, corporate, civic and government entities. Mindi managed earlier iterations of our work with the 11th Hour Project at the University of San Francisco where she served as the Senior Director of Strategy and Operations of the Data Institute. Mindi is a member (inactive) of the California and Illinois bars and received her JD from UC Hastings and her BS, Political Science from Santa Clara University.

    David Uminsky joined the University of Chicago in September 2020 as a senior research associate and Executive Director of Data Science. He was previously an associate professor of Mathematics and Executive Director of the Data Institute at University of San Francisco (USF). His research interests are in machine learning, signal processing, pattern formation, and dynamical systems.  David is an associate editor of the Harvard Data Science Review.  He was selected in 2015 by the National Academy of Sciences as a Kavli Frontiers of Science Fellow. He is also the founding Director of the BS in Data Science at USF and served as Director of the MS in Data Science program from 2014-2019. During the summer of 2018, David served as the Director of Research for the Mathematical Science Research Institute Undergrad Program on the topic of Mathematical Data Science.

    Before joining USF he was a combined NSF and UC President’s Fellow at UCLA, where he was awarded the Chancellor’s Award for outstanding postdoctoral research. He holds a Ph.D. in Mathematics from Boston University and a BS in Mathematics from Harvey Mudd College.

  • Application

    The application deadline for the 2021 program has passed. If you have a question about your application during the review process, please contact Katie Rosengarten (krosengarten@uchicago.edu). Decision notifications will be sent in early April.

    Application Timeline

    • Application Deadline: February 28th, 2021, 11:59pm CT
    • Notification Deadline: early April 2021

    Application Overview

    • Research Areas of Interest + Skills Evaluation
      • Select + explain interest in research areas (definitions provided)
      • Self-evaluation of core computational tools and skills (scale 1-5)
      • Relevant coursework (including but not limited to topics in CS, data science, statistics, math) + other experiences
    • Short Answer Questions
      • Internship Goals: What are your big picture academic goals, and what role does this program in particular play in them? This can be broad and far-reaching, but it should be clear why data and computing research plays a role. (500 words max)
      • Teamwork + Collaboration: Describe a time when you were part of a team working on a project. How did you work together and what role did you play? What was a challenge you faced as a member of that team? What’s one thing you’re proud of from that experience? (300 words max)
      • Project Description (new applicants): Describe a project you’ve undertaken. It can be a final project from a class, a side project, or one from a previous research program. In detail, describe: (1) the goals of the project and your approach; (2) tools you used and why you used them; (3) one challenge you faced and how you addressed it; (4) one achievement you’re particularly proud of; and (5) any outcomes or tangible results of the project (not required). With this question, more value will be placed on how you approached the project, rather than how advanced or technical it is. (750 words max)
      • Research Project Description (returning alumni): Describe your research project from last summer. In detail, describe: (1) the goals of the project; (2) the tools you used; (3) one challenge you faced and how you addressed it; (4) one achievement you’re particularly proud of; and (5) any outcomes or tangible results of the project. (750 words max)

    Review Criteria

    • Intellectual Curiosity: Evident interest about data science and the applied domain areas chosen.
    • Skills Baseline: Familiarity with at least one programming language, and translation of self-evaluated skills ratings in CV/relevant coursework/other experiences.
    • Initiative + Teamwork: Student has acted upon interest by pursuing available options and opportunities for computational and data science classes, training, and programs, and has successfully worked as part of a team before.
    • Research Aptitude: Creativity and curiosity, self-direction, goal-oriented and adaptable work ethic, resilient problem solving, time management and communication skills.
    • Program Fit: Clear why this program versus others is uniquely valuable to the applicant. Student is uniquely positioned to benefit from the program due to lack of access to similar programs at their home institution, or potential for growth.

    Due to the volume of applications we receive, we will be unable to provide individual feedback on applications that are not accepted.

  • FAQ

    For more questions, contact Katie Rosengarten at krosengarten@uchicago.edu.

    • Are there any program prerequisites?

      We do not require any previous research experience to participate in the program. Familiarity in at least one programming language (Python, Java, C++, etc.) is preferred, as well as relevant coursework in areas such as computer science, statistics, and math.

    • Is there an age limit for participant eligibility?

      The program is open to all current high school and undergraduate students who will be entering another year of their degree program after Summer Lab. Specifically, current high school freshmen through current undergraduate juniors/3rd years are eligible to apply.

    • Are international students eligible to apply?

      Yes, international students are eligible apply. However, all students must be authorized to work in the United States and provide all necessary documentation in support of their stipend. To see the documentation required to process stipends, please consult this page. We recommend that all international students check with their home institution’s international affairs office to ensure that they qualify.

    • What are the stipend rates for the program?

      The stipend rates for the 2021 program are below:

      • High School stipend rate: $4,875
      • Undergraduate stipend rate: $5,625
    • How many hours a week is the program?

      While students are not required to log their hours, we expect each student to work roughly a full-time schedule each week (>37.5 hrs/wk) — i.e. 8am-4pm; 9am-5pm; or 10am-6pm. Schedules are to be consulted with and confirmed by program mentors.

    • Is housing provided?

      Unfortunately, we do not provide housing as part of the program.

    • Will the 2021 program be virtual?

      The program administration will consult the recommendations of the University of Chicago and UChicago Medicine to determine the safest format for the Summer Lab 2021 program. We successfully ran the 202 program remotely, and are prepared to do so for 2021 if necessary.

      Whenever in-person research and academic activities resume, research assistants in the program are provided work space in the John Crerar Library, home to the Center for Data and Computing (CDAC) and the Computer Science Department. Unless otherwise agreed upon by their mentor and the Program Director (Kyle Chard), all students are expected to work in the open research space provided — the goal of which is to foster problem-solving and engagement across projects, domains, ages, and skill sets.

    • What are the 2021 program dates?

      For the 2021 program, we offer two program dates:

      1. June 14th — August 20th
      2. June 21st — August 27th.

      On the application, you will be asked to note the program that best suits your summer schedule and school calendar. If you have any conflicts with the program dates as listed here, please indicate so on your application.

    • Where can I see past projects in the program?

      You can view profiles of past projects in the program on our Project Profiles page. Each profile includes details about the student’s mentor, a description of the project, and a link to their final video (3-5 min/each). You can also view a playlist of all the 2020 Cohort’s final videos here.

    • If admitted, how will I be paired with a project?

      On the application, we ask for your research areas of interest, as well as self-reported experience and expertise in relevant data science and computational skills and tools. During the application review process, in combination with your research goals and resume, we will use those self-assessments to determine an applicant’s aptitude and eligibility for available research projects.

  • Student Resources
    • CDAC Mailing List
      • Subscribe to receive updates about the Data & Computing Summer Lab and other student research opportunities.
    • College Center for Research & Fellowships (CCRF)
      • CCRF supports undergraduates as they pursue transformative, educational experiences through scholarly undergraduate research and nationally competitive fellowships. Visit their website to subscribe to their weekly newsletter that highlights new research opportunities.
    • Department of Computer Science Job Board
      • Available to UChicago students as a resource for internship opportunities as well as part-time and full-time positions.

    Email us at cdac@uchicago.edu with any student research-related questions.